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Nutrition and Weight Status

Obesity, adults, 1988–94 to 2009–10

Decrease desired

NWS-9 graph

Objective NWS-9 View Leading Health Indicators

SOURCE: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), CDC/NCHS.
NOTES: Data are for the proportion of adults aged 20 and over who were obese and are age adjusted using the year 2000 standard population. Obesity is defined as body mass index (BMI) greater than or equal 30.0.

From 1999–2000 to 2009–10, the proportion of adults aged 20 and over who were obese increased 7.2% for females, from 33.4% to 35.8% (age adjusted), and 29.1% for males, from 27.5% to 35.5% (age adjusted), reaching nearly the same level in 2009–10 for males as that for females. However, the increase was not significant for females.


Obesity, children and adolescents, 1988–94 to 2009–10

Decrease desired

NWS-10.4 graph

Objective NWS-10.4 View Leading Health Indicators

SOURCE: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), CDC/NCHS.
NOTES: Data are for children and adolescents aged 2–19 years who were considered obese. Children and adolescents are considered obese when their body mass index (BMI) is greater than or equal to the gender- and age-specific 95th percentile from the 2000 CDC Growth Charts for the United States.

From 1999–2000 to 2009–10, the proportion of children and adolescents aged 2–19 years who were considered obese increased 8.7% for females, from 13.8% to 15.0%, and 32.9% for males, from 14.0% to 18.6%. However, the increase was not statistically significant for females.


Food insecurity, households, 1995–2011

Decrease desired

NWS-13 graph

Objective NWS-13

SOURCE: Current Population Survey—Food Security Supplement (CPS-FSS), Department of Commerce/Census Bureau.
NOTE: Data are for the proportion of U.S. households that reported experiencing food insecurity during a 12-month period (i.e., food insufficiency and hunger, at adult and child levels, resulting from inadequate household resources).

The proportion of U.S. households that reported experiencing food insecurity during a 12-month period increased 25.2% between 1995 and 2011, from 11.9% to 14.9%.


Sodium consumption, 2007–10

Decrease desired

NWS-19 graph

Objective NWS-19

SOURCE: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), CDC/NCHS.
NOTES: Data are for mean total daily sodium intake (in mg) by persons aged 2 years and over based on a single 24-hour dietary recall and are age adjusted using the year 2000 standard population. Respondents were asked to select one or more races. The categories `white, non-Hispanic’ and `black, non-Hispanic’ include persons who reported only one racial group. Persons of Hispanic origin may be of any race. Data by education are for persons aged 25 and over.
I = 95% confidence interval.

In 2007–10, persons aged 2 years and over had a mean total daily sodium intake of 3,588 mg (age adjusted). Sodium intake varied by sex, race and ethnicity, and education. For example:

  • Males aged 2 years and over had a mean total daily sodium intake of 4,128 mg (age adjusted), almost one and a half times the mean total daily sodium intake among females aged 2 years and over, 3,083 mg.
  • The Hispanic or Latino population aged 2 years and over had a mean total daily sodium intake of 3,334 mg (age adjusted), compared with 3,661 mg among the non-Hispanic white population aged 2 years and over.
  • Persons aged 25 and over with less than a high school education had a mean total daily sodium intake of 3,505 mg (age adjusted), compared with 3,799 mg among those with a college degree or above.

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