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Adolescent HealthNew

Find evidence-based information and recommendations related to Adolescent Health.

RatingResourceYearEvidence Type
Adolescent Health
Improving Adolescent Health: Person-to-Person Interventions to Improve Caregivers' Parenting Skills—Improving adolescent health through interventions targeted to parents and other caregivers: a recommendation. (Community Guide Recommendation)
Community Preventive Services Task Force
2012 Systematic Review
Adolescent Health
Effectiveness of Universal School-Based Programs To Prevent Violent and Aggressive Behavior: A Systematic Review
Community Preventive Services Task Force
2007 Systematic Review
Adolescent Health
School-Based Programs to Reduce Violence—A recommendation to reduce rates of violence among school-aged children and youth by means of universal school-based violence prevention programs. (Community Guide Recommendation)
Community Preventive Services Task Force
2007 Systematic Review
Adolescent Health
Therapeutic Foster Care to Reduce Violence—Recommendations to reduce violence through early childhood home visitation, therapeutic foster care, and firearms laws. (Community Guide Recommendation)
Community Preventive Services Task Force
2005 Systematic Review
Adolescent Health
Recommendations for using Tenant-based Rental Assistance Programs to Promote Healthy Social Environments—Recommendations to promote healthy social environments. (Community Guide Recommendation)
Community Preventive Services Task Force
2003 Systematic Review
Adolescent Health
Recommendations to promote healthy social environments through comprehensive early childhood development programs for low income families—Recommendations to promote healthy social environments. (Community Guide Recommendation)
Community Preventive Services Task Force
2003 Systematic Review
Adolescent Health
Parent Engagement: Strategies for Involving Parents in School Health
CDC/NCCDPHP
2012 Non-Systematic Review, Field-Based Summary or Case Study, Expert Opinion
Adolescent Health
Best Practices To Address Community Gang Problems: OJJDP’s Comprehensive Gang Model, 2nd Ed.
DOJ/OJP
2010 Experimental Study, Case-Control Study, Cross-Sectional or Prevalence Study, Field-Based Summary or Case Study, Expert Opinion
Adolescent Health
Adolescent Health Services: Missing Opportunities
National Research Council, IOM
2009 Non-Systematic Review, Randomized Controlled Trial, Experimental Study, Cohort Study, Cross-Sectional or Prevalence Study, Field-Based Summary or Case Study, Expert Opinion
Adolescent Health
Dropout Prevention: A Practice Guide
DOE/NCEE
2008 Non-Systematic Review, Randomized Controlled Trial, Experimental Study, Field-Based Summary or Case Study, Expert Opinion
Adolescent Health
Discover School Breakfast Toolkit
USDA/FNS
2012 Field-Based Summary or Case Study, Expert Opinion
 

The Healthy People 2020 evidence-based resources identified have been selected by subject matter experts at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Resources. Each of the selected evidence-based resources has been rated and classified according to a set of selection criteria based, in part, on publication status, publication type, and number of studies. This classification scheme does not necessarily consider all dimensions of quality, such as statistical significance, effect size (e.g., magnitude of effect), meaningfulness of effect, additional effect over control, and study design (e.g., sample size, power, internal validity, external validity, generalizability, potential biases, potential confounders).

 

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Consumer Information

The following consumer resources are from healthfinder.gov.

Prevent Bullying: Quick tips for parents

Many kids don't tell an adult when they're being bullied. Use these tips to start a conversation with your child before you see signs of a problem.

Make the Most of Your Child's Visit to the Doctor (Ages 11 to 14 years)

Children ages 11 to 14 need to go to the doctor for a “well-child visit” once a year. Get the most out of your child's next visit by gathering important information to share with the doctor.

Make the Most of Your Teen's Visit to the Doctor (Ages 15 to 17 years)

Teens ages 15 to 17 need to go to the doctor for a “well-child visit” once a year. Encourage your teen to get involved in doctors' visits.

Talk to Your Teen about Healthy Relationships

Talk with your teen about how to build strong, respectful relationships.

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