IVP-42 Reduce children’s exposure to violence

National Data Source
National Survey of Children's Exposure to Violence (NatSCEV); Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (DOJ/OJJDP)
Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch
Yes
Measure
percent 
Baseline (Year)
58.8 (2008)
Target
52.9
Target-Setting Method
10 percent improvement
Numerator
Children aged 17 years and under who have been exposed in the past year to any form of violence measured
Denominator
Children aged 17 years and under
Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data

From the 2008 National Survey of Children's Exposure to Violence:

[NUMERATOR:]

The survey asked screening questions about 44 types of victimization in the following categories:

Conventional crime.

Nine types of victimization, including robbery, theft, destruction of property, attack with an object or weapon, attack without an object or weapon, attempted attack, threatened attack, kidnapping or attempted kidnapping, and hate crime or bias attack (an attack on a child because of the child's or parent's skin color, religion, physical problem, or perceived sexual orientation).

Child maltreatment.

Four types of victimization, including being hit, kicked, or beaten by an adult (other than spanking on the bottom); psychological or emotional abuse; neglect; and abduction by a parent or caregiver, also known as custodial interference.

Peer and sibling victimization.

Six types of victimization, including being attacked by a group of children; being hit or beaten by another child, including a brother or sister; being hit or kicked in the private parts; being chased, grabbed, or forced to do something; being teased or emotionally bullied; and being a victim of dating violence.

Sexual victimization.

Seven types of victimization, including sexual contact or fondling by an adult the child knew, sexual contact or fondling by an adult stranger, sexual contact or fondling by another child or teenager, attempted or completed intercourse, exposure or "flashing," sexual harassment, and consensual sexual conduct with an adult.

Witnessing and indirect victimization.

These fall into two general categories, exposure to community violence and exposure to family violence. For exposure to community violence, the survey included six types of victimization, including seeing someone attacked with an object or weapon; seeing someone attacked without an object or weapon; having something stolen from the household; having a friend, neighbor, or family member murdered; witnessing a murder; witnessing or hearing a shooting, bombing, or riot; being in a war zone; knowing a family member or close friend who was fondled or forced to have sex; knowing a family member or close friend who was robbed or mugged; and knowing a family member or close friend who was threatened with a gun or knife.

For exposure to family violence, eight types of victimization were assessed: seeing a parent assaulted by a spouse, domestic partner, or boyfriend or girlfriend; seeing a brother or sister assaulted by a parent; threat by one parent to assault the other; threat by a parent to damage the other parent's property; one parent pushing the other; one parent hitting or slapping the other; one parent kicking, choking, or beating up the other; and assault by another adult household member against a child or adult in the household.

School violence and threat.

Two types of victimization, including a credible bomb threat against the child's school and fire or other property damage to the school.

Internet violence and victimization.

Two types of victimization, including internet threats or harassment and unwanted online sexual solicitation.

Data Collection Frequency
Periodic
Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective
Not applicable

Comments

Methodology Notes

Survey respondents include children aged 10-17 years or parent proxies for those aged 9 years and younger.

Description of Changes Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch

The original baseline was revised from 60.6 to 58.8 due to a change in the methodology. The algorithm to define exposure to violence was revised because four survey questions related to witness and indirect vicimization, which contributed only a small percentage of total victimization in 2008 (about 0.5%), were dropped from the NatSCEV survey in 2011. The discontinued items include witnessing a murder, knowing a family member or close friend who was fondled or forced to have sex, knowing a family member or close friend who was robbed or mugged, and knowing a family member or close friend who was threatened with a gun or knife Thus, the 2008 data were reanalyzed to remove these four items so that the data are comparable with those in subsequent years. The target was adjusted from 54.5 to 52.9 to reflect the revised baseline using the original target-setting method.

References and More Information

  1. Children’s Exposure to Violence: A Comprehensive National Survey
    http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/ojjdp/227744.pdf