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Food Safety Data Details

FS-1 Reduce infections caused by key pathogens transmitted commonly through food

About the Data

Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

National Data Source
Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office of Infectious Diseases (CDC/NCID)
Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch
No
Measure
per 100,000 
Baseline (Year)
12.7 (2006-2008)
Target
8.5
Target-Setting Method
Projection/trend analysis
Numerator
Number of culture-confirmed cases of illness caused by Campylobacter species reported to CDC
Denominator
Number of persons in FoodNet surveillance area
Data Collection Frequency
Annual
Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective
Retained from HP2010 objective
Methodology Notes

FoodNet conducts surveillance for Campylobacter, Cryptosporidium, Cyclospora, Listeria, Salmonella, Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157 and non-O157, Shigella, Vibrio, and Yersinia infections diagnosed by laboratory testing of samples from patients.

The network was established in July 1995 and is a collaborative program among CDC, 10 state health departments, the Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service (USDA-FSIS), and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). FoodNet personnel located at state health departments regularly contact the clinical laboratories in Connecticut, Georgia, Maryland, Minnesota, New Mexico, Oregon, Tennessee and selected counties in California, Colorado, and New York to get reports of infections diagnosed in residents of these areas. The surveillance area includes 15% of the United States population (47 million persons) and is generally racially and ethnically representative of the entire U.S. population, with only a slight under-representation of Hispanics. FoodNet is the principal foodborne disease component of CDC's Emerging Infections Program.

FoodNet accomplishes its work through active surveillance; surveys of laboratories, physicians, and the general population; and population-based epidemiologic studies. Information from FoodNet is used to assess the impact of food safety initiatives on the burden of foodborne illness. Please see Questions and Answers about FoodNet Data (PDF document on the FoodNet website) for more information about FoodNet and how the program works.

References

Additional resources about the objective.

  1. Foodborne Disease Active Surveillance Network
    http://www.cdc.gov/foodnet
  2. Patrick, Mary. 2009. An Introduction to FoodNet Sites. In Emerging Infections Program FoodNet News, 2(4):1. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/foodnet/news/2009/Summer2009FoodNetNews.pdf

About the Data

Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

National Data Source
Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office of Infectious Diseases (CDC/NCID)
Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch
No
Measure
per 100,000 
Baseline (Year)
1.2 (2006-2008)
Target
0.6
Target-Setting Method
Projection/trend analysis
Numerator
Number of culture-confirmed cases of illness caused by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157 reported to CDC
Denominator
Number of persons in FoodNet surveillance area
Data Collection Frequency
Annual
Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective
Retained from HP2010 objective
Methodology Notes

FoodNet conducts surveillance for Campylobacter, Cryptosporidium, Cyclospora, Listeria, Salmonella, Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157 and non-O157, Shigella, Vibrio, and Yersinia infections diagnosed by laboratory testing of samples from patients.

The network was established in July 1995 and is a collaborative program among CDC, 10 state health departments, the Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service (USDA-FSIS), and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). FoodNet personnel located at state health departments regularly contact the clinical laboratories in Connecticut, Georgia, Maryland, Minnesota, New Mexico, Oregon, Tennessee and selected counties in California, Colorado, and New York to get reports of infections diagnosed in residents of these areas. The surveillance area includes 15% of the United States population (47 million persons) and is generally racially and ethnically representative of the entire U.S. population, with only a slight under-representation of Hispanics. FoodNet is the principal foodborne disease component of CDC's Emerging Infections Program.

FoodNet accomplishes its work through active surveillance; surveys of laboratories, physicians, and the general population; and population-based epidemiologic studies. Information from FoodNet is used to assess the impact of food safety initiatives on the burden of foodborne illness. Please see Questions and Answers about FoodNet Data (PDF document on the FoodNet website) for more information about FoodNet and how the program works.

References

Additional resources about the objective.

  1. Foodborne Disease Active Surveillance Network
    http://www.cdc.gov/foodnet
  2. Patrick, Mary. 2009. An Introduction to FoodNet Sites. In Emerging Infections Program FoodNet News, 2(4):1. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/foodnet/news/2009/Summer2009FoodNetNews.pdf

About the Data

Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

National Data Source
Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office of Infectious Diseases (CDC/NCID)
Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch
No
Measure
per 100,000 
Baseline (Year)
0.3 (2006-2008)
Target
0.2
Target-Setting Method
Projection/trend analysis
Numerator
Number culture-confirmed cases of illness cause by Listeria monocytogenes reported to CDC
Denominator
Number of persons in FoodNet surveillance area
Data Collection Frequency
Annual
Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective
Retained from HP2010 objective
Methodology Notes

FoodNet conducts surveillance for Campylobacter, Cryptosporidium, Cyclospora, Listeria, Salmonella, Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157 and non-O157, Shigella, Vibrio, and Yersinia infections diagnosed by laboratory testing of samples from patients.

The network was established in July 1995 and is a collaborative program among CDC, 10 state health departments, the Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service (USDA-FSIS), and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). FoodNet personnel located at state health departments regularly contact the clinical laboratories in Connecticut, Georgia, Maryland, Minnesota, New Mexico, Oregon, Tennessee and selected counties in California, Colorado, and New York to get reports of infections diagnosed in residents of these areas. The surveillance area includes 15% of the United States population (47 million persons) and is generally racially and ethnically representative of the entire U.S. population, with only a slight under-representation of Hispanics. FoodNet is the principal foodborne disease component of CDC's Emerging Infections Program.

FoodNet accomplishes its work through active surveillance; surveys of laboratories, physicians, and the general population; and population-based epidemiologic studies. Information from FoodNet is used to assess the impact of food safety initiatives on the burden of foodborne illness. Please see Questions and Answers about FoodNet Data (PDF document on the FoodNet website) for more information about FoodNet and how the program works.

References

Additional resources about the objective.

  1. Foodborne Disease Active Surveillance Network
    http://www.cdc.gov/foodnet
  2. Patrick, Mary. 2009. An Introduction to FoodNet Sites. In Emerging Infections Program FoodNet News, 2(4):1. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/foodnet/news/2009/Summer2009FoodNetNews.pdf

About the Data

Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

National Data Source
Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office of Infectious Diseases (CDC/NCID)
Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch
No
Measure
per 100,000 
Baseline (Year)
15.0 (2006-2008)
Target
11.4
Target-Setting Method
Projection/trend analysis
Numerator
Number of culture-confirmed cases of illness caused by Salmonella species reported to CDC
Denominator
Number of persons in FoodNet surveillance area
Data Collection Frequency
Annual
Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective
Retained from HP2010 objective
Methodology Notes

FoodNet conducts surveillance for Campylobacter, Cryptosporidium, Cyclospora, Listeria, Salmonella, Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157 and non-O157, Shigella, Vibrio, and Yersinia infections diagnosed by laboratory testing of samples from patients.

The network was established in July 1995 and is a collaborative program among CDC, 10 state health departments, the Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service (USDA-FSIS), and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). FoodNet personnel located at state health departments regularly contact the clinical laboratories in Connecticut, Georgia, Maryland, Minnesota, New Mexico, Oregon, Tennessee and selected counties in California, Colorado, and New York to get reports of infections diagnosed in residents of these areas. The surveillance area includes 15% of the United States population (47 million persons) and is generally racially and ethnically representative of the entire U.S. population, with only a slight under-representation of Hispanics. FoodNet is the principal foodborne disease component of CDC's Emerging Infections Program.

FoodNet accomplishes its work through active surveillance; surveys of laboratories, physicians, and the general population; and population-based epidemiologic studies. Information from FoodNet is used to assess the impact of food safety initiatives on the burden of foodborne illness. Please see Questions and Answers about FoodNet Data (PDF document on the FoodNet website) for more information about FoodNet and how the program works.

References

Additional resources about the objective.

  1. Foodborne Disease Active Surveillance Network
    http://www.cdc.gov/foodnet
  2. Patrick, Mary. 2009. An Introduction to FoodNet Sites. In Emerging Infections Program FoodNet News, 2(4):1. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/foodnet/news/2009/Summer2009FoodNetNews.pdf

About the Data

Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

National Data Source
Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office of Infectious Diseases (CDC/NCID)
Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch
No
Measure
per 100,000 
Baseline (Year)
2.0 (2006-2008)
Target
1.0
Target-Setting Method
Projection/trend analysis
Numerator
Number of cases of illness caused by postdiarrheal hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) in children less than 5 years of age reported to CDC
Denominator
Number of persons in FoodNet surveillance area
Data Collection Frequency
Annual
Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective
Retained from HP2010 objective
Methodology Notes

FoodNet conducts surveillance for Campylobacter, Cryptosporidium, Cyclospora, Listeria, Salmonella, Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157 and non-O157, Shigella, Vibrio, and Yersinia infections diagnosed by laboratory testing of samples from patients.

The network was established in July 1995 and is a collaborative program among CDC, 10 state health departments, the Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service (USDA-FSIS), and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). FoodNet personnel located at state health departments regularly contact the clinical laboratories in Connecticut, Georgia, Maryland, Minnesota, New Mexico, Oregon, Tennessee and selected counties in California, Colorado, and New York to get reports of infections diagnosed in residents of these areas. The surveillance area includes 15% of the United States population (47 million persons) and is generally racially and ethnically representative of the entire U.S. population, with only a slight under-representation of Hispanics. FoodNet is the principal foodborne disease component of CDC's Emerging Infections Program.

FoodNet accomplishes its work through active surveillance; surveys of laboratories, physicians, and the general population; and population-based epidemiologic studies. Information from FoodNet is used to assess the impact of food safety initiatives on the burden of foodborne illness. Please see Questions and Answers about FoodNet Data (PDF document on the FoodNet website) for more information about FoodNet and how the program works.

References

Additional resources about the objective.

  1. Foodborne Disease Active Surveillance Network
    http://www.cdc.gov/foodnet
  2. Patrick, Mary. 2009. An Introduction to FoodNet Sites. In Emerging Infections Program FoodNet News, 2(4):1. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/foodnet/news/2009/Summer2009FoodNetNews.pdf

About the Data

Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

National Data Source
Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office of Infectious Diseases (CDC/NCID)
Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch
No
Measure
per 100,000 
Baseline (Year)
0.3 (2006-2008)
Target
0.2
Target-Setting Method
Projection/trend analysis
Numerator
Number of culture-confirmed cases of illness caused by Vibrio species reported to CDC
Denominator
Number of persons in FoodNet surveillance area
Data Collection Frequency
Annual
Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective
Not applicable
Methodology Notes

FoodNet conducts surveillance for Campylobacter, Cryptosporidium, Cyclospora, Listeria, Salmonella, Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157 and non-O157, Shigella, Vibrio, and Yersinia infections diagnosed by laboratory testing of samples from patients.

The network was established in July 1995 and is a collaborative program among CDC, 10 state health departments, the Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service (USDA-FSIS), and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). FoodNet personnel located at state health departments regularly contact the clinical laboratories in Connecticut, Georgia, Maryland, Minnesota, New Mexico, Oregon, Tennessee and selected counties in California, Colorado, and New York to get reports of infections diagnosed in residents of these areas. The surveillance area includes 15% of the United States population (47 million persons) and is generally racially and ethnically representative of the entire U.S. population, with only a slight under-representation of Hispanics. FoodNet is the principal foodborne disease component of CDC's Emerging Infections Program.

FoodNet accomplishes its work through active surveillance; surveys of laboratories, physicians, and the general population; and population-based epidemiologic studies. Information from FoodNet is used to assess the impact of food safety initiatives on the burden of foodborne illness. Please see Questions and Answers about FoodNet Data (PDF document on the FoodNet website) for more information about FoodNet and how the program works.

References

Additional resources about the objective.

  1. Foodborne Disease Active Surveillance Network
    http://www.cdc.gov/foodnet
  2. Patrick, Mary. 2009. An Introduction to FoodNet Sites. In Emerging Infections Program FoodNet News, 2(4):1. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/foodnet/news/2009/Summer2009FoodNetNews.pdf

About the Data

Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

National Data Source
Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office of Infectious Diseases (CDC/NCID)
Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch
No
Measure
per 100,000 
Baseline (Year)
0.4 (2006-2008)
Target
0.3
Target-Setting Method
Projection/trend analysis
Numerator
Number of culture-confirmed cases of illness caused by Yersinia species other than Yersinia pestis reported to CDC
Denominator
Number of persons in FoodNet surveillance area
Data Collection Frequency
Annual
Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective
Not applicable
Methodology Notes

FoodNet conducts surveillance for Campylobacter, Cryptosporidium, Cyclospora, Listeria, Salmonella, Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157 and non-O157, Shigella, Vibrio, and Yersinia infections diagnosed by laboratory testing of samples from patients.

The network was established in July 1995 and is a collaborative program among CDC, 10 state health departments, the Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service (USDA-FSIS), and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). FoodNet personnel located at state health departments regularly contact the clinical laboratories in Connecticut, Georgia, Maryland, Minnesota, New Mexico, Oregon, Tennessee and selected counties in California, Colorado, and New York to get reports of infections diagnosed in residents of these areas. The surveillance area includes 15% of the United States population (47 million persons) and is generally racially and ethnically representative of the entire U.S. population, with only a slight under-representation of Hispanics. FoodNet is the principal foodborne disease component of CDC's Emerging Infections Program.

FoodNet accomplishes its work through active surveillance; surveys of laboratories, physicians, and the general population; and population-based epidemiologic studies. Information from FoodNet is used to assess the impact of food safety initiatives on the burden of foodborne illness. Please see Questions and Answers about FoodNet Data (PDF document on the FoodNet website) for more information about FoodNet and how the program works.

References

Additional resources about the objective.

  1. Foodborne Disease Active Surveillance Network
    http://www.cdc.gov/foodnet
  2. Patrick, Mary. 2009. An Introduction to FoodNet Sites. In Emerging Infections Program FoodNet News, 2(4):1. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/foodnet/news/2009/Summer2009FoodNetNews.pdf
FS-2 Reduce the number of outbreak-associated infections due to Shiga toxin-producing E. coli O157, or Campylobacter, Listeria, or Salmonella species associated with food commodity groups

About the Data

Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

National Data Source
National Outbreak Reporting System (NORS); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CDC and CSTE)
Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch
No
Measure
number 
Baseline (Year)
200 (2006-2008)
Target
180
Target-Setting Method
10 percent improvement
Numerator
Number of outbreak-associated infections due to Shiga toxin-producing E. coli O157, or Campylobacter, Listeria, or Salmonella species associated with beef
Data Collection Frequency
Annual
Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective
Not applicable
Methodology Notes

CDC launched NORS in 2009 as a web-based platform into which health departments enter outbreak information. Through NORS, CDC collects reports of enteric disease outbreaks caused by bacterial, viral, parasitic, chemical, toxin, and unknown agents, as well as waterborne outbreaks of non-enteric disease.

National foodborne and waterborne disease outbreak surveillance has been a core function of CDC since the 1970s. Two surveillance systems handle this responsibility: the Waterborne Disease and Outbreak Surveillance System (1971-present) and the Foodborne Disease Outbreak Surveillance System (1973-present). Foodborne disease outbreak data have been collected electronically since 1998. NORS was designed to integrate the outbreak reporting systems and enhance national outbreak reporting with new components.

A foodborne disease outbreak (FBDO) is defined as the occurrence of two or more cases of a similar illness resulting from the ingestion of a common food. FBDOs are reported to CDC on a standard reporting form. Outbreaks of known etiology are those for which laboratory evidence of a specific agent is obtained that meets specified criteria for that agent. Most reports are received from state and local health departments; they also may be received from tribal, territorial, or federal agencies. Not included in this surveillance system are FBDOs occurring on cruise ships and FBDOs due to consumption of food outside the United States, even if the illness occurs within the United States. Because the size of outbreaks can vary widely, and because improvements in outbreak detection, investigation, and reporting are likely to lead to a disproportionate increase in reports of relatively smaller outbreaks, tracking the number of reported outbreak-associated infections is more informative and valuable than tracking the number of reported outbreaks. The FBDO surveillance system is an open database; reporting agencies can add, modify, or delete current or past reports.

Tracking disease associated with outbreaks attributed to food vehicles may help us determine how to prioritize outbreak prevention efforts and may enable us to determine the efficacy of focused prevention, education and other efforts on particular food commodity groups.

Other organizations that collaborate with CDC on outbreak surveillance and prevention include CSTE, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and the Department of Agriculture (USDA).

About the Data

Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

National Data Source
National Outbreak Reporting System (NORS); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CDC and CSTE)
Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch
No
Measure
number 
Baseline (Year)
786 (2006-2008)
Target
707
Target-Setting Method
10 percent improvement
Numerator
Number of outbreak-associated infections due to Shiga toxin-producing E. coli O157, or Campylobacter, Listeria, or Salmonella species associated with dairy
Data Collection Frequency
Annual
Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective
Not applicable
Methodology Notes

CDC launched NORS in 2009 as a web-based platform into which health departments enter outbreak information. Through NORS, CDC collects reports of enteric disease outbreaks caused by bacterial, viral, parasitic, chemical, toxin, and unknown agents, as well as waterborne outbreaks of non-enteric disease.

National foodborne and waterborne disease outbreak surveillance has been a core function of CDC since the 1970s. Two surveillance systems handle this responsibility: the Waterborne Disease and Outbreak Surveillance System (1971-present) and the Foodborne Disease Outbreak Surveillance System (1973-present). Foodborne disease outbreak data have been collected electronically since 1998. NORS was designed to integrate the outbreak reporting systems and enhance national outbreak reporting with new components.

A foodborne disease outbreak (FBDO) is defined as the occurrence of two or more cases of a similar illness resulting from the ingestion of a common food. FBDOs are reported to CDC on a standard reporting form. Outbreaks of known etiology are those for which laboratory evidence of a specific agent is obtained that meets specified criteria for that agent. Most reports are received from state and local health departments; they also may be received from tribal, territorial, or federal agencies. Not included in this surveillance system are FBDOs occurring on cruise ships and FBDOs due to consumption of food outside the United States, even if the illness occurs within the United States. Because the size of outbreaks can vary widely, and because improvements in outbreak detection, investigation, and reporting are likely to lead to a disproportionate increase in reports of relatively smaller outbreaks, tracking the number of reported outbreak-associated infections is more informative and valuable than tracking the number of reported outbreaks. The FBDO surveillance system is an open database; reporting agencies can add, modify, or delete current or past reports.

Tracking disease associated with outbreaks attributed to food vehicles may help us determine how to prioritize outbreak prevention efforts and may enable us to determine the efficacy of focused prevention, education and other efforts on particular food commodity groups.

Other organizations that collaborate with CDC on outbreak surveillance and prevention include the CSTE, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and the Department of Agriculture (USDA).

About the Data

Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

National Data Source
National Outbreak Reporting System (NORS); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CDC and CSTE)
Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch
No
Measure
number 
Baseline (Year)
311 (2006-2008)
Target
280
Target-Setting Method
10 percent improvement
Numerator
Number of outbreak-associated infections due to Shiga toxin-producing E. coli O157, or Campylobacter, Listeria, or Salmonella species associated with fruits and nuts
Data Collection Frequency
Annual
Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective
Not applicable
Methodology Notes

CDC launched NORS in 2009 as a web-based platform into which health departments enter outbreak information. Through NORS, CDC collects reports of enteric disease outbreaks caused by bacterial, viral, parasitic, chemical, toxin, and unknown agents, as well as waterborne outbreaks of non-enteric disease.

National foodborne and waterborne disease outbreak surveillance has been a core function of CDC since the 1970s. Two surveillance systems handle this responsibility: the Waterborne Disease and Outbreak Surveillance System (1971-present) and the Foodborne Disease Outbreak Surveillance System (1973-present). Foodborne disease outbreak data have been collected electronically since 1998. NORS was designed to integrate the outbreak reporting systems and enhance national outbreak reporting with new components.

A foodborne disease outbreak (FBDO) is defined as the occurrence of two or more cases of a similar illness resulting from the ingestion of a common food. FBDOs are reported to CDC on a standard reporting form. Outbreaks of known etiology are those for which laboratory evidence of a specific agent is obtained that meets specified criteria for that agent. Most reports are received from state and local health departments; they also may be received from tribal, territorial, or federal agencies. Not included in this surveillance system are FBDOs occurring on cruise ships and FBDOs due to consumption of food outside the United States, even if the illness occurs within the United States. Because the size of outbreaks can vary widely, and because improvements in outbreak detection, investigation, and reporting are likely to lead to a disproportionate increase in reports of relatively smaller outbreaks, tracking the number of reported outbreak-associated infections is more informative and valuable than tracking the number of reported outbreaks. The FBDO surveillance system is an open database; reporting agencies can add, modify, or delete current or past reports.

Tracking disease associated with outbreaks attributed to food vehicles may help us determine how to prioritize outbreak prevention efforts and may enable us to determine the efficacy of focused prevention, education and other efforts on particular food commodity groups.

Other organizations that collaborate with CDC on outbreak surveillance and prevention include CSTE, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and the Department of Agriculture (USDA).

About the Data

Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

National Data Source
National Outbreak Reporting System (NORS); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CDC and CSTE)
Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch
No
Measure
number 
Baseline (Year)
205 (2006-2008)
Target
185
Target-Setting Method
10 percent improvement
Numerator
Number of outbreak-associated infections due to Shiga toxin-producing E. coli O157, or Campylobacter, Listeria, or Salmonella species associated with leafy vegetables  
Data Collection Frequency
Annual
Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective
Not applicable
Methodology Notes

CDC launched NORS in 2009 as a web-based platform into which health departments enter outbreak information. Through NORS, CDC collects reports of enteric disease outbreaks caused by bacterial, viral, parasitic, chemical, toxin, and unknown agents, as well as waterborne outbreaks of non-enteric disease.

National foodborne and waterborne disease outbreak surveillance has been a core function of CDC since the 1970s. Two surveillance systems handle this responsibility: the Waterborne Disease and Outbreak Surveillance System (1971-present) and the Foodborne Disease Outbreak Surveillance System (1973-present). Foodborne disease outbreak data have been collected electronically since 1998. NORS was designed to integrate the outbreak reporting systems and enhance national outbreak reporting with new components.

A foodborne disease outbreak (FBDO) is defined as the occurrence of two or more cases of a similar illness resulting from the ingestion of a common food. FBDOs are reported to CDC on a standard reporting form. Outbreaks of known etiology are those for which laboratory evidence of a specific agent is obtained that meets specified criteria for that agent. Most reports are received from state and local health departments; they also may be received from tribal, territorial, or federal agencies. Not included in this surveillance system are FBDOs occurring on cruise ships and FBDOs due to consumption of food outside the United States, even if the illness occurs within the United States. Because the size of outbreaks can vary widely, and because improvements in outbreak detection, investigation, and reporting are likely to lead to a disproportionate increase in reports of relatively smaller outbreaks, tracking the number of reported outbreak-associated infections is more informative and valuable than tracking the number of reported outbreaks. The FBDO surveillance system is an open database; reporting agencies can add, modify, or delete current or past reports.

Tracking disease associated with outbreaks attributed to food vehicles may help us determine how to prioritize outbreak prevention efforts and may enable us to determine the efficacy of focused prevention, education and other efforts on particular food commodity groups.

Other organizations that collaborate with CDC on outbreak surveillance and prevention include CSTE, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and the Department of Agriculture (USDA).

About the Data

Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

National Data Source
National Outbreak Reporting System (NORS); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CDC and CSTE)
Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch
No
Measure
number 
Baseline (Year)
258 (2006-2008)
Target
232
Target-Setting Method
10 percent improvement
Numerator
Number of outbreak-associated infections due to Shiga toxin-producing E. coli O157, or Campylobacter, Listeria, or Salmonella species associated with poultry
Data Collection Frequency
Annual
Methodology Notes

CDC launched NORS in 2009 as a web-based platform into which health departments enter outbreak information. Through NORS, CDC collects reports of enteric disease outbreaks caused by bacterial, viral, parasitic, chemical, toxin, and unknown agents, as well as waterborne outbreaks of non-enteric disease.

National foodborne and waterborne disease outbreak surveillance has been a core function of CDC since the 1970s. Two surveillance systems handle this responsibility: the Waterborne Disease and Outbreak Surveillance System (1971-present) and the Foodborne Disease Outbreak Surveillance System (1973-present). Foodborne disease outbreak data have been collected electronically since 1998. NORS was designed to integrate the outbreak reporting systems and enhance national outbreak reporting with new components.

A foodborne disease outbreak (FBDO) is defined as the occurrence of two or more cases of a similar illness resulting from the ingestion of a common food. FBDOs are reported to CDC on a standard reporting form. Outbreaks of known etiology are those for which laboratory evidence of a specific agent is obtained that meets specified criteria for that agent. Most reports are received from state and local health departments; they also may be received from tribal, territorial, or federal agencies. Not included in this surveillance system are FBDOs occurring on cruise ships and FBDOs due to consumption of food outside the United States, even if the illness occurs within the United States. Because the size of outbreaks can vary widely, and because improvements in outbreak detection, investigation, and reporting are likely to lead to a disproportionate increase in reports of relatively smaller outbreaks, tracking the number of reported outbreak-associated infections is more informative and valuable than tracking the number of reported outbreaks. The FBDO surveillance system is an open database; reporting agencies can add, modify, or delete current or past reports.

Tracking disease associated with outbreaks attributed to food vehicles may help us determine how to prioritize outbreak prevention efforts and may enable us to determine the efficacy of focused prevention, education and other efforts on particular food commodity groups.

Other organizations that collaborate with CDC on outbreak surveillance and prevention include CSTE, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and the Department of Agriculture (USDA).

FS-3 Prevent an increase in the proportion of nontyphoidal Salmonella and Campylobacter jejuni isolates from humans that are resistant to antimicrobial drugs.

About the Data

Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

National Data Source
National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System for Enteric Bacteria (NARMS); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (CDC/NCEZID)
Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch
No
Measure
percent 
Baseline (Year)
2.0 (2006-2008)
Target
2.0
Target-Setting Method
Maintain the baseline value.
Numerator
Number of non-typhoidal Salmonella isolates that are resistant to nalidixic acid
Denominator
Number of non- typhoidal Salmonella isolates tested for resistance to nalidixic acid
Data Collection Frequency
Annual
Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective
Adapted from HP2010 objective
Methodology Notes

The primary objectives of NARMS are to:

  1. Monitor trends in antimicrobial resistance among foodborne bacteria from humans, retail meats, and animals
  2. Disseminate timely information on antimicrobial resistance to promote interventions that reduce resistance among foodborne bacteria
  3. Conduct research to better understand the emergence, persistence, and spread of antimicrobial resistance
  4. Assist the FDA in making decisions related to the approval of safe and effective antimicrobial drugs for animals

In 1996, surveillance for Salmonella in NARMS began in 14 sites. Since 2003, all 50 states have been participating, which represent a population of approximately 308 million (US census, 2010). Participating sites forward every Salmonella Typhi isolate, every twentieth non-typhoidal Salmonella, every twentieth Shigella isolate, and every twentieth E. coli O157 isolate received at their public health laboratories to NARMS at CDC for susceptibility testing.

Susceptibility testing involves determination of minimum inhibitory concentrations for 15 antimicrobial agents: amikacin, ampicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, cefoxitin, ceftiofur, ceftriaxone, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, kanamycin, nalidixic acid, streptomycin, sulfisoxazole, tetracycline, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Resistance in non-typhoidal Salmonella is used for this objective. Non-typhoidal Salmonella excludes the following Salmonella serotypes: Typhi, Paratyphi A, Paratyphi B (i.e., tartrate negative isolates), and Paratyphi C. Tartrate positive Salmonella serotype Paratyphi B isolates are referred to as Salmonella serotype Paratyphi B var. L(+) tartrate+ and are not typically associated with typhoidal disease.

Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020
This objective differs from Healthy People 2010 objective 10-3a in that the word “species” was omitted from the Healthy People 2020 objective to reflect current Salmonella nomenclature. Typhoidal isolates are not included in the Healthy People 2020 objective because they are associated with international travel. Nalidixic acid is tracked in Healthy People 2020 rather than the generic flouroquinolones. Nalidixic acid is representative of the quinolone class.

References

Additional resources about the objective.

  1. National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System for Enteric Bacteria
    http://www.cdc.gov/narms

About the Data

Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

National Data Source
National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System for Enteric Bacteria (NARMS); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (CDC/NCEZID)
Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch
No
Measure
percent 
Baseline (Year)
3.0 (2006-2008)
Target
3.0
Target-Setting Method
Maintain the baseline value.
Numerator
Number of non-typhoidal Salmonella isolates that are resistant to ceftriaxone
Denominator
Number of non- typhoidal Salmonella isolates tested for resistance to ceftriaxone
Data Collection Frequency
Annual
Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective
Adapted from HP2010 objective
Methodology Notes

The primary objectives of NARMS are to:

  1. Monitor trends in antimicrobial resistance among foodborne bacteria from humans, retail meats, and animals
  2. Disseminate timely information on antimicrobial resistance to promote interventions that reduce resistance among foodborne bacteria
  3. Conduct research to better understand the emergence, persistence, and spread of antimicrobial resistance
  4. Assist the FDA in making decisions related to the approval of safe and effective antimicrobial drugs for animals

In 1996, surveillance for Salmonella in NARMS began in 14 sites. Since 2003, all 50 states have been participating, which represent a population of approximately 308 million (US census, 2010). Participating sites forward every Salmonella Typhi isolate, every twentieth non-typhoidal Salmonella, every twentieth Shigella isolate, and every twentieth E. coli O157 isolate received at their public health laboratories to NARMS at CDC for susceptibility testing.

Susceptibility testing involves determination of minimum inhibitory concentrations for 15 antimicrobial agents: amikacin, ampicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, cefoxitin, ceftiofur, ceftriaxone, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, kanamycin, nalidixic acid, streptomycin, sulfisoxazole, tetracycline, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Resistance in non-typhoidal Salmonella is used for this objective. Non-typhoidal Salmonella excludes the following Salmonella serotypes: Typhi, Paratyphi A, Paratyphi B (i.e., tartrate negative isolates), and Paratyphi C. Tartrate positive Salmonella serotype Paratyphi B isolates are referred to as Salmonella serotype Paratyphi B var. L(+) tartrate+ and are not typically associated with typhoidal disease.

Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020
This objective differs from Healthy People 2010 objective 10-3b in that the word “species” was omitted from the Healthy People 2020 objective to reflect current Salmonella nomenclature. Typhoidal isolates are not included in the Healthy People 2020 objective because they are associated with international travel. Ceftriaxone is tracked in Healthy People 2020 rather than the generic third-generation cephalosporins. Ceftriaxone is particularly important in the treatment of life-threatening Salmonella infection in children.

References

Additional resources about the objective.

  1. National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System for Enteric Bacteria
    http://www.cdc.gov/narms

About the Data

Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

National Data Source
National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System for Enteric Bacteria (NARMS); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (CDC/NCEZID)
Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch
No
Measure
percent 
Baseline (Year)
2.0 (2006-2008)
Target
2.0
Target-Setting Method
Maintain the baseline value.
Numerator
Number of non-typhoidal Salmonella isolates that are resistant to gentamicin
Denominator
Number of non- typhoidal Salmonella isolates tested for resistance to gentamicin
Data Collection Frequency
Annual
Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective
Retained from HP2010 objective
Methodology Notes

The primary objectives of NARMS are to:

  1. Monitor trends in antimicrobial resistance among foodborne bacteria from humans, retail meats, and animals
  2. Disseminate timely information on antimicrobial resistance to promote interventions that reduce resistance among foodborne bacteria
  3. Conduct research to better understand the emergence, persistence, and spread of antimicrobial resistance
  4. Assist the FDA in making decisions related to the approval of safe and effective antimicrobial drugs for animals

In 1996, surveillance for Salmonella in NARMS began in 14 sites. Since 2003, all 50 states have been participating, which represent a population of approximately 308 million (US census, 2010). Participating sites forward every Salmonella Typhi isolate, every twentieth non-typhoidal Salmonella, every twentieth Shigella isolate, and every twentieth E. coli O157 isolate received at their public health laboratories to NARMS at CDC for susceptibility testing.

Susceptibility testing involves determination of minimum inhibitory concentrations for 15 antimicrobial agents: amikacin, ampicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, cefoxitin, ceftiofur, ceftriaxone, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, kanamycin, nalidixic acid, streptomycin, sulfisoxazole, tetracycline, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Resistance in non-typhoidal Salmonella is used for this objective. Non-typhoidal Salmonella excludes the following Salmonella serotypes: Typhi, Paratyphi A, Paratyphi B (i.e., tartrate negative isolates), and Paratyphi C. Tartrate positive Salmonella serotype Paratyphi B isolates are referred to as Salmonella serotype Paratyphi B var. L(+) tartrate+ and are not typically associated with typhoidal disease.

Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020
The word “species” was omitted to reflect current Salmonella nomenclature. Typhoidal isolates are not included in the Healthy People 2020 objective because they are associated with international travel.

References

Additional resources about the objective.

  1. National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System for Enteric Bacteria
    http://www.cdc.gov/narms

About the Data

Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

National Data Source
National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System for Enteric Bacteria (NARMS); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (CDC/NCEZID)
Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch
No
Measure
percent 
Baseline (Year)
10.0 (2006-2008)
Target
10.0
Target-Setting Method
Maintain the baseline value.
Numerator
Number of non-typhoidal Salmonella isolates that are resistant to ampicillin
Denominator
Number of non- typhoidal Salmonella isolates tested for resistance to ampicillin
Data Collection Frequency
Annual
Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective
Retained from HP2010 objective
Methodology Notes

The primary objectives of NARMS are to:

  1. Monitor trends in antimicrobial resistance among foodborne bacteria from humans, retail meats, and animals
  2. Disseminate timely information on antimicrobial resistance to promote interventions that reduce resistance among foodborne bacteria
  3. Conduct research to better understand the emergence, persistence, and spread of antimicrobial resistance
  4. Assist the FDA in making decisions related to the approval of safe and effective antimicrobial drugs for animals

In 1996, surveillance for Salmonella in NARMS began in 14 sites. Since 2003, all 50 states have been participating, which represent a population of approximately 308 million (US census, 2010). Participating sites forward every Salmonella Typhi isolate, every twentieth non-typhoidal Salmonella, every twentieth Shigella isolate, and every twentieth E. coli O157 isolate received at their public health laboratories to NARMS at CDC for susceptibility testing.

Susceptibility testing involves determination of minimum inhibitory concentrations for 15 antimicrobial agents: amikacin, ampicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, cefoxitin, ceftiofur, ceftriaxone, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, kanamycin, nalidixic acid, streptomycin, sulfisoxazole, tetracycline, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Resistance in non-typhoidal Salmonella is used for this objective. Non-typhoidal Salmonella excludes the following Salmonella serotypes: Typhi, Paratyphi A, Paratyphi B (i.e., tartrate negative isolates), and Paratyphi C. Tartrate positive Salmonella serotype Paratyphi B isolates are referred to as Salmonella serotype Paratyphi B var. L(+) tartrate+ and are not typically associated with typhoidal disease.

Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020
The word “species” was omitted to reflect current Salmonella nomenclature. Typhoidal isolates are not included in the Healthy People 2020 objective because they are associated with international travel.

References

Additional resources about the objective.

  1. National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System for Enteric Bacteria
    http://www.cdc.gov/narms

About the Data

Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

National Data Source
National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System for Enteric Bacteria (NARMS); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (CDC/NCEZID)
Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch
No
Measure
percent 
Baseline (Year)
11.0 (2006-2008)
Target
11.0
Target-Setting Method
Maintain the baseline value.
Numerator
Number of non-typhoidal Salmonella isolates that are resistant to three or more classes of antimicrobial agents
Denominator
Number of non- typhoidal Salmonella isolates tested for resistance to three or more classes of antimicrobial agents
Data Collection Frequency
Annual
Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective
Not applicable
Methodology Notes

The primary objectives of NARMS are to:

  1. Monitor trends in antimicrobial resistance among foodborne bacteria from humans, retail meats, and animals
  2. Disseminate timely information on antimicrobial resistance to promote interventions that reduce resistance among foodborne bacteria
  3. Conduct research to better understand the emergence, persistence, and spread of antimicrobial resistance
  4. Assist the FDA in making decisions related to the approval of safe and effective antimicrobial drugs for animals

In 1996, surveillance for Salmonella in NARMS began in 14 sites. Since 2003, all 50 states have been participating, which represent a population of approximately 308 million (US census, 2010). Participating sites forward every Salmonella Typhi isolate, every twentieth non-typhoidal Salmonella, every twentieth Shigella isolate, and every twentieth E. coli O157 isolate received at their public health laboratories to NARMS at CDC for susceptibility testing.

Susceptibility testing involves determination of minimum inhibitory concentrations for 15 antimicrobial agents: amikacin, ampicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, cefoxitin, ceftiofur, ceftriaxone, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, kanamycin, nalidixic acid, streptomycin, sulfisoxazole, tetracycline, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Resistance in non-typhoidal Salmonella is used for this objective. Non-typhoidal Salmonella excludes the following Salmonella serotypes: Typhi, Paratyphi A, Paratyphi B (i.e., tartrate negative isolates), and Paratyphi C. Tartrate positive Salmonella serotype Paratyphi B isolates are referred to as Salmonella serotype Paratyphi B var. L(+) tartrate+ and are not typically associated with typhoidal disease.

Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020
The word “species” was omitted to reflect current Salmonella nomenclature. Typhoidal isolates are not included in the Healthy People 2020 objective because they are associated with international travel.

References

Additional resources about the objective.

  1. National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System for Enteric Bacteria
    http://www.cdc.gov/narms

About the Data

Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

National Data Source
National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System for Enteric Bacteria (NARMS); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (CDC/NCEZID)
Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch
No
Measure
percent 
Baseline (Year)
2.0 (2006-2008)
Target
2.0
Target-Setting Method
Maintain the baseline value.
Numerator
Number of Campylobacter jejuni isolates that are resistant to erythromycin
Denominator
Number of Campylobacter jejuni isolates tested for resistance to erythromycin
Data Collection Frequency
Annual
Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective
Not applicable
Methodology Notes

The primary objectives of NARMS are to:

  1. Monitor trends in antimicrobial resistance among foodborne bacteria from humans, retail meats, and animals
  2. Disseminate timely information on antimicrobial resistance to promote interventions that reduce resistance among foodborne bacteria
  3. Conduct research to better understand the emergence, persistence, and spread of antimicrobial resistance
  4. Assist the FDA in making decisions related to the approval of safe and effective antimicrobial drugs for animals

In 1997, surveillance for Campylobacter in NARMS began in sites participating in the Foodborne Disease Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet). There were 5 participating sites in 1997. Since 2003 10 FoodNet sites have been participating: California, Colorado, Connecticut, Georgia, Maryland, Minnesota, New York, New Mexico, Oregon, and Tennessee. The 10 FoodNet sites represent about 98 million or 32% of the US population (US Census, 2010) Participating sites forward Participating sites forward a representative sample of Campylobacter isolates received at their public health laboratories to NARMS at CDC for susceptibility testing. Susceptibility testing involves determination of minimum inhibitory for 9 antimicrobial agents: azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, clindamycin, erythromycin, florfenicol, gentamicin, nalidixic acid, telithromycin, and tetracycline.

References

Additional resources about the objective.

  1. National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System for Enteric Bacteria
    http://www.cdc.gov/narms

About the Data

Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

National Data Source
Food Safety Survey; Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch
No
Measure
percent 
Baseline (Year)
29.3 (2006)
Target
21.0
Target-Setting Method
Projection/trend analysis
Numerator
Number of persons 18 years and older with doctor-diagnosed food allergies who report an allergic reaction within the last 5 years and who report that the allergic reaction was severe (required the use of epinephrine, or treatment in a hospital or doctor’s office, or an overnight stay in a hospital)
Denominator
Number of persons 18 years and older with doctor-diagnosed food allergies
Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data

From the 2006 Food Safety Survey:

[NUMERATOR:]

I'd like to ask if you have any current food allergies, or do you suspect you have a food allergy?

  1. Yes*
  2. No or not aware of
  3. Someone in household died from food allergy
  4. Don't know
  5. Refused

Has a medical doctor diagnosed your condition as a food allergy?

  1. Yes*
  2. No
  3. Don't know
  4. Refused

When was the last time you had an allergic reaction to food, or had symptoms you thought were caused by an allergic reaction to food?

  1. Less than one month*
  2. One - 2 months*
  3. 3 - 6 months*
  4. 7 - 11 months*
  5. 1 - 2 years*
  6. 3 - 5 years*
  7. 6 - 9 years
  8. 10 - 14 years
  9. 15 - 19 years
  10. 20 years or more
  11. Never

Was epinephrine [EP eh NEF rin] used to treat this most recent reaction?

  1. Yes*
  2. No
  3. Does not recall specific instance
  4. Don't know
  5. Refused

Were you [was he/she] treated in a hospital or doctor's office for this reaction? Which?

  1. Yes, hospital*
  2. Yes, doctor's office*
  3. No
  4. Does not recall specific instance
  5. Don't know
  6. Refused

Did you/he/she have to stay overnight in the hospital?

  1. Yes*
  2. No
  3. Don't know
  4. Refused

*RESPONSE IS INCLUDED IN THE CALCULATIONS.

Data Collection Frequency
Periodic
Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective
Retained from HP2010 objective
Methodology Notes

The estimate for this measure is calculated by first defining a sub-sample of survey respondents who report a doctor-diagnosed food allergy. The percentage of this group that had an allergic reaction to food within the last 5 years and whose reaction required the use of epinephrine, or treatment in a hospital or doctor's office, or an overnight stay in a hospital is the numerator. Weights are applied that adjust for probability of selection (the number of telephones in the house and the number of adults in the house) and that adjust the sample to census estimates on the characteristics of sex, race, and education.

References

Additional resources about the objective.

  1. Food Safety Survey
    http://www.fda.gov/Food/FoodScienceResearch/ConsumerBehaviorResearch/ucm080374.htm
  2. Food Safety Survey (OMB Control Number 0910-0345-Reinstatement). Federal Register; 74:177. September 15, 2009. pp 47256-47257.
FS-5 Increase the proportion of consumers who follow key food safety practices

About the Data

Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

National Data Source
Food Safety Survey; Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch
No
Measure
percent 
Baseline (Year)
67.2 (2006)
Target
74.0
Target-Setting Method
10 percent improvement
Numerator
The percent of consumers aged 18 years and older who report they follow the key food safety practice: Clean: Wash hands and surfaces often
Denominator
Number of practices measured among persons aged 18 years and older who prepare food (consumers)
Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data

From the 2006 Food Safety Survey:

[NUMERATOR:]

Before you begin preparing food, how often do you wash your hands with soap? Would you say

  1. All of the time*
  2. Most of the time
  3. Some of the time, or
  4. Rarely>

After you have cracked open raw eggs, do you usually continue cooking, or do you first rinse your hands with water, wipe them, or wash them with soap?

  1. Continue cooking
  2. Rinse or wipe hands
  3. Wash with soap*
  4. Never handle raw eggs

After handling raw meat or chicken, do you usually continue cooking, or do you first rinse your hands with water, or wipe them, or wash them with soap?

  1. Continue cooking
  2. Rinse or wipe hands
  3. Wash with soap*
  4. Don't cut raw meat or chicken

After handling raw fish, do you usually continue cooking, or do you first rinse your hands with water, wipe them, or wash them with soap?

  1. Continue cooking
  2. Rinse or wipe hands
  3. Wash with soap*
  4. Never handle raw fish

*RESPONSE IS INCLUDED IN THE CALCULATIONS.

Data Collection Frequency
Periodic
Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective
Adapted from HP2010 objective
Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020
This objective differs from Healthy People 2010 objective 10-5 in that it tracks one of the four components of the Healthy People 2010 objective (Clean, Separate, Cook, and Chill). These components are tracked as separate objectives in Healthy People 2020 to more clearly show where progress is being made, or where more effort towards improvement is needed.

References

Additional resources about the objective.

  1. Food Safety Survey
    http://www.fda.gov/Food/FoodScienceResearch/ConsumerBehaviorResearch/ucm080374.htm
  2. Food Safety Survey (OMB Control Number 0910-0345-Reinstatement). Federal Register; 74:177. September 15, 2009. pp 47256-47257.

About the Data

Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

National Data Source
Food Safety Survey; Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch
No
Measure
percent 
Baseline (Year)
88.6 (2006)
Target
92.0
Target-Setting Method
Projection/trend analysis
Numerator
The percent of consumers aged 18 years and older who report they follow the key food safety practice: Separate: Don’t cross-contaminate
Denominator
Number of practices measured among persons aged 18 years and older who prepare food (consumers)
Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data

From the 2006 Food Safety Survey:

[NUMERATOR:]

After you have used a cutting board or other surface for cutting raw meat or chicken, do you use it as it is for cutting other food to be eaten raw for the same meal, or do you first rinse it, or wipe it, or wash it with soap?

  1. Use it as it is
  2. Rinse or wipe it
  3. Wash with soap*
  4. Wash with bleach*
  5. Use a different cutting board*
  6. Don't cut raw meat or poultry*

After cutting raw fish or shellfish, what do you do with the cutting board or surface? [Do you use it as it is for cutting food to be eaten raw for the same meal, or do you first rinse it, or wipe it, or wash it with soap?] (NOTE: MATERIAL IN BRACKETS MAY NOT NEED TO BE READ).

  1. Use it as it is
  2. Rinse or wipe it
  3. Wash with soap*
  4. Wash with bleach*
  5. Use a different cutting board*

*RESPONSE IS INCLUDED IN THE CALCULATIONS.

Data Collection Frequency
Periodic
Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective
Not applicable
Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020
This objective differs from Healthy People 2010 objective 10-5 in that it tracks one of the four components of the Healthy People 2010 objective (Clean, Separate, Cook, and Chill). These components are tracked as separate objectives in Healthy People 2020 to more clearly show where progress is being made, or where more effort towards improvement is needed.

References

Additional resources about the objective.

  1. Food Safety Survey
    http://www.fda.gov/Food/FoodScienceResearch/ConsumerBehaviorResearch/ucm080374.htm
  2. Food Safety Survey (OMB Control Number 0910-0345-Reinstatement). Federal Register; 74:177. September 15, 2009. pp 47256-47257.

About the Data

Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

National Data Source
Food Safety Survey; Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch
No
Measure
percent 
Baseline (Year)
36.9 (2006)
Target
76.0
Target-Setting Method
Projection/trend analysis
Numerator
The percent of consumers aged 18 years and older who report they follow the key food safety practice: Cook to proper temperatures
Denominator
Number of practices measured among persons aged 18 years and older who prepare food (consumers)
Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data

From the 2006 Food Safety Survey:

[NUMERATOR:]

In your home, are hamburgers usually served...(PROBE: IF DIFFERENT WAYS FOR DIFFERENT PEOPLE: What is the rarest degree of doneness hamburgers are served?)

  1. Rare
  2. Medium, or
  3. Well done?*
  4. Hamburgers are never served

[If 2:] When you say hamburgers are usually served "medium," do you mean they are...

  1. Brown all the way through,* or
  2. Still have some pink in the middle?

In the past 12 months, did you eat any of the following foods that contain raw eggs? (Did you eat. . .) (In the past 12 months, did you eat . . .)

  1. Raw, homemade cookie or cake batter?
  2. Homemade frosting with raw egg?
  3. Caesar salad with raw egg?
  4. Chocolate mousse with raw egg?
  5. Homemade eggnog?
  6. Homemade mayonnaise?
  7. Homemade ice cream with raw egg?
  8. Shakes with raw egg?
  9. Homemade hollandaise sauce?

NOTE TO INTERVIEWERS: COMMERCIAL FROZEN OR REFRIGERATED COOKIE DOUGH IS PASTEURIZED; IT DOES NOT CONTAIN RAW EGGS EVEN BEFORE IT IS BAKED. COMMERCIAL CAKE AND COOKIE MIXES USUALLY CALL FOR ADDING RAW EGGS, SO THEY COUNT AS EATING RAW EGGS.)

In the past 12 months, which of the following raw foods did you eat?

  1. Raw oysters
  2. Sushi, ceviche (se - VEE - chay), or other raw fish

Thinking of your usual habits over the past year, when you prepare the following foods, how often do you use a thermometer?

a) Roasts or other large pieces of meat--how often do you use a thermometer when you cook roasts? Would you say. .

  1. Always*
  2. Often*
  3. Sometimes,* or
  4. Never
  5. Never cook the food

b) Chicken parts, such as breasts or legs--how often do you use a thermometer when you cook chicken parts? Would you say. .

  1. Always*
  2. Often*
  3. Sometimes,* or
  4. Never
  5. Never cook the food

c) How about hamburgers--how often do you use a thermometer when you cook hamburgers? Would you say. . .

  1. Always*
  2. Often*
  3. Sometimes,* or
  4. Never
  5. Never cook the food

*RESPONSE IS INCLUDED IN THE CALCULATIONS.

Data Collection Frequency
Periodic
Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective
Not applicable
Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020
This objective differs from Healthy People 2010 objective 10-5 in that it tracks one of the four components of the Healthy People 2010 objective (Clean, Separate, Cook, and Chill). These components are tracked as separate objectives in Healthy People 2020 to more clearly show where progress is being made, or where more effort towards improvement is needed.

References

Additional resources about the objective.

  1. Food Safety Survey
    http://www.fda.gov/Food/FoodScienceResearch/ConsumerBehaviorResearch/ucm080374.htm
  2. Food Safety Survey (OMB Control Number 0910-0345-Reinstatement). Federal Register; 74:177. September 15, 2009. pp 47256-47257.

About the Data

Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

National Data Source
Food Safety Survey; Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch
No
Measure
percent 
Baseline (Year)
88.1 (2006)
Target
91.1
Target-Setting Method
Projection/trend analysis
Numerator
The percent of consumers aged 18 years and older who report they follow the key food safety practice: Chill: Refrigerate promptly
Denominator
Number of practices measured among persons aged 18 years and older who prepare food (consumers)
Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data

From the 2006 Food Safety Survey:

[NUMERATOR:]

If you cook a large pot of soup, stew, or other food with meat or chicken and want to save it for the next day, when do you put the food in the refrigerator? Would it be (READ 1-3) . . .

  1. Immediately*
  2. After first cooling it at room temperature, or
  3. After first cooling it in cold water?*
  4. Do not cook such foods
  5. Would not refrigerate it

[If (2):] For about how long would you let it cool at room temperature? (DO NOT READ LIST)

  1. Less than 2 hours*
  2. 2 hours or more

How about if the soup or stew contains fish or shellfish instead of meat or chicken. If you want to save it for the next day, when do you put the food in the refrigerator? Would it be (READ 1-3)

  1. Immediately*
  2. After first cooling it at room temperature, or
  3. After first cooling it in cold water?*
  4. Do not cook such foods
  5. Would not refrigerate it

[If (2):] For about how long would you let it cool at room temperature (DO NOT READ LIST)

  1. Less than 2 hours*
  2. 2 hours or more

*RESPONSE IS CODED AS SAFE.

Data Collection Frequency
Periodic
Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective
Not applicable
Changes Between HP2010 and HP2020
This objective differs from Healthy People 2010 objective 10-5 in that it tracks one of the four components of the Healthy People 2010 objective (Clean, Separate, Cook, and Chill). These components are tracked as separate objectives in Healthy People 2020 to more clearly show where progress is being made, or where more effort towards improvement is needed.

References

Additional resources about the objective.

  1. Food Safety Survey
    http://www.fda.gov/Food/FoodScienceResearch/ConsumerBehaviorResearch/ucm080374.htm
  2. Food Safety Survey (OMB Control Number 0910-0345-Reinstatement). Federal Register; 74:177. September 15, 2009. pp 47256-47257.

About the Data

Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch
No
Measure
percent 
Numerator
*** Missing ***
Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective
Adapted from HP2010 objective