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TU-5.1 Data Details

TU-5.1 Increase recent smoking cessation success by adult smokers

About the Data

Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

National Data Source
National Health Interview Survey (NHIS); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics (CDC/NCHS)
Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch
No
Measure
percent (age adjusted—see Comments)
Baseline (Year)
6.0 (2008)
Target
8.0
Target-Setting Method
2 percentage point improvement
Numerator
Number of persons aged 18 years and over who ever smoked 100 cigarettes, who do not smoke now, and last smoked 6 months to 1 year ago.
Denominator
Number of persons aged 18 years and over who have ever smoked 100 cigarettes, who do not smoke now, and last smoked less than or equal to 1 year ago, PLUS current smokers who initiated smoking at least 2 years ago.
Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data

From the 2008 National Health Interview Survey:

[NUMERATOR and DENOMINATOR:]

How long has it been since you quit smoking cigarettes?

  1. _______ days
  2. _______ weeks
  3. _______ months
  4. _______ years
  5. Refused
  6. Don't Know

Have you smoked at least 100 cigarettes in your ENTIRE LIFE?

  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. Refused
  4. Don't Know

How old were you when you FIRST started to smoke fairly regularly?

_____ years of age

  • Refused
  • Don't Know
  • Do you NOW smoke cigarettes every day, some days or not at all?

    1. Every day
    2. Some days
    3. Not at all
    4. Refused
    5. Don't Know
    Data Collection Frequency
    Annual
    Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective
    Not applicable
    Methodology Notes

    This indicator measures the proportion of current adult smokers aged 18 years and over who are eligible to be a recent quitter who have had recent smoking cessation success. Persons who are eligible to quit smoking in the last year include persons who have ever smoked 100 cigarettes and who report that they stopped smoking within the past 1 year as well as current (everyday or someday) smokers who initiated smoking 2 or more years ago.

    Time since initiation is determined by subtracting the age reported for when the respondent first started smoking regularly from the respondent’s current age. If the difference is 2 years or greater these persons are considered to be eligible to be a recent quitter. Persons who responded that they were 85 years or older when they first started smoking regularly are counted as initiating at age 85.

    Persons who reported that they stopped smoking in the past 1 year can report time since quitting in days, weeks, months, and years and are included in the denominator if they reported as follows: (1-94 days; 1-52 weeks; 1-12 months; 1 year). Recent success in smoking cessation included persons who reported that they stopped smoking 6 months to 1 year ago and are included in the numerator if they reported as follows: (26-52 weeks; 6-12 months; 1 year).

    Age Adjustment

    This Indicator uses Age-Adjustment Groups:

    • Total: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
    • Sex: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
    • Race/Ethnicity: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
    • Educational Attainment: 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
    • Family Income: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
    • Family Type: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
    • Country of Birth: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
    • Disability Status: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
    • Geographic Location: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
    • Health Insurance Status: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64
    • Marital Status: 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-64, 65+
    Caveats and Limitations
    Please note that responses of 1 year ago for time since quit may actually be greater than 1 year depending on how the respondent responded to the survey question.

    References

    Additional resources about the objective.

    1. CDC. Cigarette smoking among adults --- United States, 2007. MMWR 2008; 57:1221-1226.
    2. Fiore MC, Jaén CR, Baker TB, et al. Treating Tobacco Use and Dependence: 2008 Update. Quick Reference Guide for Clinicians. Rockville, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Public Health Service. April 2009.