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AH-10 Data Details

AH-10 Reduce the proportion of public schools with a serious violent incident

About the Data

Description of the data source, numerator, denominator, survey questions, and other relevant details about the national estimate.

National Data Source
School Survey on Crime and Safety (SSOCS); Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics (ED/NCES)
Changed Since the Healthy People 2020 Launch
No
Measure
percent 
Baseline (Year)
17.2 (2007-2008)
Target
15.5
Target-Setting Method
10 percent improvement
Numerator
Public schools in the United States that report a serious violent incident during a school year
Denominator
Public schools in the United States
Questions Used to Obtain the National Baseline Data

Please record the number of incidents that occurred at school during the [fill year] school year for the offenses listed below:

Data Collection Frequency
Biennial
Comparable Healthy People 2010 Objective
Not applicable
Methodology Notes

A serious violent incident is defined as a report of any of the following offenses: Rape or attempted rape; sexual battery other than rape (including threatened rape); robbery either with or without a weapon; physical attack or fight with a weapon; threat of a physical attack with a weapon.

School principals from a nationally representative stratified random sample of U.S. public schools, including public charter schools but excluding special education schools, vocational schools and alternative schools, home schools, ungraded schools, overseas Department of Defense schools, schools sponsored by the Bureau of Indian Education, and schools in the U.S. outlying areas and Puerto Rico, respond to a mailed questionnaire. In school year 2007-08, a total of 2560 public schools submitted usable questionnaires, including 618 primary schools, 897 middle schools, 936 high schools, and 109 combined schools. A larger percent of the target sample was allocated to middle and high schools.

Data for primary school includes schools in which the lowest grade is not higher than grade 3 and the highest grade is not higher than grade 8. Data for middle schools includes schools in which the lowest grade is not lower than grade 4 and the highest grade is not higher than grade 9. Data for high schools includes schools in which the lowest grade is not lower than grade 9 and the highest grade is not higher than grade 12. Data for combined schools includes all combinations of grades, including K–12 schools, other than primary, middle, and high schools.

Data for city includes territories inside an urbanized area and inside a principal city and includes large cities (populations of 250,000 or more), midsize cities (population less than 250,000 and greater than or equal to 100,000) and small cities (population less than 100,000). Data for suburb includes territories outside a principal city and inside an urbanized area and includes large suburbs (populations of 250,000 or more), midsize suburbs (population less than 250,000 and greater than or equal to 100,000) and small suburbs (population less than 100,000). Data for town includes fringe towns (territories inside an urban cluster that is less than or equal to 10 miles from an urbanized area), distant towns (territories inside an urban cluster 35 miles from an urbanized area), and remote towns (territories which are inside an urban cluster that is more than 35 miles from an urbanized area). Data for rural includes fringe rural areas (Census-defined rural territory that is less than or equal to 5 miles from an urbanized area, as well as rural territory that is less than or equal to 2.5 miles from an urban cluster), distant rural areas (Census-defined rural territory that is more than 5 miles but less than or equal to 25 miles from an urbanized area, as well as rural territory that is more than 2.5 miles but less than 10 miles from an urban cluster), and remote rural areas (Census-defined rural territory that is more than 25 miles from an urbanized 10 miles from an urban cluster).

Percent minority enrollment is the percent combined enrollment of Black, Hispanic, Asian/Pacific Islander, and American Indian/Alaska Native students.

References

Additional resources about the objective.

  1. Dinkes, R., Kemp, J., and Baum, K. (2009). Indicators of School Crime and Safety: 2009 (NCES 2010–012/ NCJ 228478). National Center for Education Statistics, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education, and Bureau of Justice Statistics, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice. Washington, DC.
    http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2010/2010012.pdf
  2. National Center for Education Statistics: School Survey on Crime and Safety (SSOCS)
    http://nces.ed.gov/surveys/ssocs
  3. SCHOOL SURVEY ON CRIME AND SAFETY 2007–08 SCHOOL YEAR PRINCIPAL QUESTIONNAIRE