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Injury and Violence

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Where We’ve Been and Where We’re Going

Over the past decade, the death rate from all injuries increased by 8 percent. In 2000, the injury death rate was 52.8 deaths per 100,000 population (age adjusted), compared to a rate of 57.1 in 2010. During the same period, the homicide rate declined 10 percent from 5.9 deaths per 100,000 population (age adjusted) in 2000 to 5.3 in 2010. Several groups had lower rates of injury deaths and homicide compared to their counterparts, including the Asian or Pacific Islander population, women, and people born outside of the US.

Leading Health Indicators

Leading Health Indicators are critical health issues that – if tackled appropriately – will dramatically reduce the leading causes of death, preventable illness, and disability in the United States. The Leading Health Indicators for Injury and Violence are:

Reduce fatal injuries (IVP-1.1)

  • Healthy People 2020 objective IVP-1.1 tracks deaths from all injuries regardless of intent (unintentional, intentional, and undetermined).
    • HP2020 Baseline: In 2007, 59.7 deaths per 100,000 population (age adjusted) were caused by injuries.
    • HP2020 Target: 53.7 deaths per 100,000 population (age adjusted), a 10 percent improvement over the baseline.
    • Over the past decade, the injury death rate increased by 8 percent. In 2000, the injury death rate was 52.8 (age adjusted), compared to a rate of 57.1 in 2010.
  • Among racial and ethnic groups, the Asian or Pacific Islander population had the lowest injury death rate; 23.6 deaths per 100,000 population (age adjusted) in 2010. The rates of injury death for the American Indian or Alaska Native, white non-Hispanic, black non-Hispanic, and Hispanic populations were 65.7, 61.9, 58.1, and 37.8, respectively, per 100,000 population (age adjusted). The rate for the American Indian or Alaska Native population was nearly three times as high as the best group rate; the rate for the white non-Hispanic population was more than two and a half times the best group rate; the rate for the black non-Hispanic population was about two and a half times the best group rate; and the rate for the Hispanic or Latino population more than one a half times that for the best group.
  • Females had a lower injury death rate than males (34.1 versus 81.8 deaths per 100,000 population, age adjusted, in 2010). The rate for males was almost two and a half times the rate for females.

Injury Death Rate by Sex, 2010

The rate for men was about 2 1/2 times the rate for women.

SOURCE: National Vital Statistics System (NVSS-M), CDC/NCHS.

  • People living in metropolitan areas had a lower injury death rate than those living in non-metropolitan areas (53.8 versus 74.2 deaths per 100,000 population, age adjusted, in 2010). The rate for people living in non-metropolitan areas was almost one and a half times the rate for those living in metropolitan areas.
  • Married people had the lowest injury death rate among marital status groups aged 25 years and over; 48.4 deaths per 100,000 population (age adjusted) in 2010. The rates for never-married, divorced, and widowed people were 109.0, 122.8, and 132.9 deaths, respectively, per 100,000 population (age adjusted) in 2010. The injury death rate for never-married people was more than twice the best group rate; the injury death rate for divorced people was about two and a half times that for the best group; and the injury death rate for widowed people was nearly three times the best group rate.
  • People born outside of the U.S. had a lower injury death rate than those born in the U.S. (34.3 versus 61.5 deaths per 100,000 population, age adjusted, in 2010). The rate for people born in the U.S. was nearly twice the rate for those born outside of the U.S.
  • People under age 18 had the lowest injury death rate, 12.2 deaths per 100,000 population in 2010, among broad age groups. Rates for the other age groups were:
    • 61.3 deaths per 100,000 population among people aged 18 to 44 years, about five times the best group rate.
    • 66.4 deaths per 100,000 population among people aged 45 to 64 years, almost five and a half times the best group rate.
    • 120.6 deaths per 100,000 population among people aged 65 years and over (highest rate), nearly ten times the best group rate.
  • When further refining the age groups, people aged 5 to 11 years had the lowest injury death rate, 4.3 deaths per 100,000 population in 2010. Rates for the other age groups were:
    • 16.8 deaths per 100,000 population among people aged 0 to 4 years, nearly four times the best group rate.
    • 17.4 deaths per 100,000 population among people aged 12 to 17 years, about four times the best group rate.
    • 61.2 deaths per 100,000 population among people aged 18 to 24 years, more than fourteen times the best group rate.
    • 61.3 deaths per 100,000 population among people aged 25 to 44 years, almost fourteen and a half times the best group rate.
    • 70.7 deaths per 100,000 population among people aged 45 to 54 years, almost sixteen and a half times the best group rate.
    • 61.0 deaths per 100,000 population among people aged 55 to 64 years, more than fourteen times the best group rate.
    • 60.0 deaths per 100,000 population among people aged 65 to 74 years, about fourteen times the best group rate.
    • 124.7 deaths per 100,000 population among people aged 75 to 84 years, twenty nine times the best group rate.
    • 349.9 deaths per 100,000 population among people aged 85 years and over (highest rate), almost eighty one and a half times the best group rate.

Endnotes:

  • Unless otherwise stated, all comparisons described are statistically significant at the 0.05 level of significance.
  • Data for this measure are available annually from the National Vital Statistics System-Mortality (NVSS-M), CDC/NCHS.
  • The terms “Hispanic or Latino” and “Hispanic” are used interchangeably in this report.
  • Data (except those by marital status, country of birth, and age group) are age adjusted to the 2000 standard population using the age groups < 1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, and 85 years and over. Data by marital status are adjusted using the age groups 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, and 85 years and over. Data by country of birth are adjusted using the age groups < 5, 5-17, 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, and 75 years and over. Data by age group are not age adjusted. Age-adjusted rates are weighted sums of age-specific rates.

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Reduce homicides (IVP-29)

  • Healthy People 2020 objective IVP-29 tracks homicides.
    • HP2020 Baseline: In 2007, there were 6.1 homicides per 100,000 population (age adjusted).
    • HP2020 Target: 5.5 homicides (age adjusted) per 100,000 population, a 10 percent improvement over the baseline.
    • The homicide rate did not change between 2000 and 2008 (5.9 deaths per 100,000 population, age adjusted). However, the rate declined 10 percent between 2008 and 2010, to 5.3 per 100,000 population (age adjusted).
  • Among racial and ethnic groups, the Asian or Pacific Islander population had the lowest rate of deaths from homicide, 1.8 per 100,000 population (age adjusted) in 2010. The rates for the black non-Hispanic, American Indian or Alaska Native, Hispanic or Latino, and white non-Hispanic populations were 18.6, 5.7, 5.3, and 2.5, respectively, per 100,000 population (age adjusted) in 2010. The rate for the black non-Hispanic population was almost ten and a half times the best group rate; the rate for the American Indian or Alaska Native population was more than three times the best group rate; and the rate for the Hispanic or Latino population was nearly three times the best group rate.

Homicide Rate by Race/Ethnicity, 2010

RATE OF DEATH FROM HOMICIDE PER 100,000 (age-adjusted in 2009)

SOURCE: National Vital Statistics System (NVSS-M), CDC/NCHS.

Accessible Version

  • Males had homicide rates of 8.4 per 100,000 population (age adjusted) in 2010, compared to a rate of 2.3 for females. The homicide rate for males was more than three and a half times the rate for females.
  • Married people had the lowest homicide rate among marital status groups aged 25 years and over, 2.6 deaths per 100,000 population (age adjusted) in 2010. The rates for never-married, widowed, and divorced people were 10.2, 10.1, and 7.5 deaths, respectively, per 100,000 population (age adjusted) in 2010. The homicide rates for never married and widowed people were nearly four times the best group rate; and the homicide rate for divorced people was nearly three times that for the best group.
  • People aged 65 years and over had the lowest homicide rate, 2.0 deaths per 100,000 population in 2010, among broad age groups. Rates for the other age groups were:
    • 2.3 deaths per 100,000 population among persons aged less than 18 years.
    • 9.5 deaths per 100,000 population among people aged 18 to 44 years, nearly five times the best group rate.
    • 3.8 deaths per 100,000 population among people aged 45 to 64 years, nearly twice the best group rate.
  • When further refining the age groups, people aged 5 to 11 years had the lowest homicide death rate, 0.5 deaths per 100,000 population in 2010. Rates for the other age groups were:
    • 3.4 deaths per 100,000 population among people aged 0 to 4 years, nearly seven times the best group rate.
    • 3.3 deaths per 100,000 population among people aged 12 to 17 years, more than six and a half times the best group rate.
    • 12.9 deaths per 100,000 population among people aged 18 to 24 years (highest rate), nearly twenty six times the best group rate.
    • 8.2 deaths per 100,000 population among people aged 25 to 44 years, almost sixteen and a half times the best group rate.
    • 4.4 deaths per 100,000 population among people aged 45 to 54 years, nearly nine times the best group rate.
    • 2.9 deaths per 100,000 population among people aged 55 to 64 years, nearly six times the best group rate.
    • 2.1 deaths per 100,000 population among people aged 65 to 74 years, more than four times the best group rate.
    • 1.9 deaths per 100,000 population among people aged 75 to 84 years, nearly four times the best group rate.
    • 2.0 deaths per 100,000 population among people aged 85 years and over, four times the best group rate.

Endnotes:

  • Unless otherwise stated, all comparisons described are statistically significant at the 0.05 level of significance.
  • Data for this measure are available annually from the National Vital Statistics System-Mortality (NVSS-M), CDC/NCHS.
  • The terms “Hispanic or Latino” and “Hispanic” are used interchangeably in this report.
  • Data (except those by marital status, country of birth, and age group) are age adjusted to the 2000 standard population using the age groups < 1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, and 85 years and over. Data by marital status are adjusted using the age groups 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, and 85 years and over. Data by country of birth are adjusted using the age groups < 5, 5-17, 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, and 75 years and over. Data by age group are not age adjusted. Age-adjusted rates are weighted sums of age-specific rates.

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